The Plant Paradox talks about lectins, a kind of protein, and how lectins affect our health. You will be amazed to learn that most of the food that we thought to be healthy by now has made us sick. Do not worry, though. You will immediately understand the logic of Doctor Gundry’s remarks.

The Plant Paradox - Steven R. Gundry

Lectins are the new carbs

The Food Paradox tells us why many of the food we eat makes us sick, and with easy examples. For example, tomato, which is one of my favourite fruits, is highly harmful to us because it contains lectin. However, when it is deseeded and peeled, it becomes edible because now it is free of lectin. Since we consume tomatoes very commonly, I wanted to start with this example. Now to the grains. Do you have any idea what the most popular lectin in wheat is? It is gluten! Gluten is a kind of lectin, and it is abundant in wheat.

Did you know that a plant knows when it is being eaten? Well, as recent research reveals, it does, but it doesn’t just sit there and accept its fate.

Steven R. Gundry

Why did we focus solely on gluten and ignore other lectins? Another question may be why we have never concentrated on lectins so far. When it comes to health and nutrition, such issues will always be on our minds. But reading, learning and questioning need to continue no matter what.

Whenever I read the book of a doctor I’ve just discovered, I’m sceptical. After enough research and thinking, if I feel like it is right, I try the diet for a while. Since this book supported my current diet, it was easier for me to try it. After reading this book, I’m sure you’ll want to try a strict lectin diet and follow all the changes in your life. Give it a try; you won’t regret it.

The Plant Paradox talks about lectins, a kind of protein, and how lectins affect our health. You will be amazed to learn that most of the food that we thought to be healthy by now has made us sick. Do not worry, though. You

You can also follow Steven R. Gundry’s Youtube Channel, lots of great information!

About the book: The Plant Paradox

From renowned cardiac surgeon Steven R. Gundry, MD, a revolutionary look at the hidden compounds in “healthy” foods like fruit, vegetables, and whole grains that are causing us to gain weight and develop chronic disease.

In the deadly game of predator versus prey, an adult gazelle can outrun a hungry lioness, a sparrow can take flight when stalked by a cat, and a skunk can let loose a spray of noxious liquid to temporarily blind a fox. The stakes aren’t always rigged against the prey. But when the prey is a plant, the poor thing is helpless, right? Wrong. Plants actually have an impressive array of defense tactics to protect themselves from predators of all shapes and sizes—including humans.

Dr. Stephen Gundry explains that these defense strategies make the seemingly virtuous plants that we consume every day—fruits, vegetables, grains, nuts, and seeds—far less “good for us” than we assume. Plants may use physical deterrents (think: the spine-tipped leaves of an artichoke or the hard outer coating of a seed) as well as chemical warfare to repel predators. One of the most common forms of plants’ chemical defense system comes in the form of proteins called lectins.

Found in the seeds, grains, skins, rinds, and leaves of most plants, lectins act as smart bombs in the human body, causing toxic or inflammatory reactions that lead to serious conditions such as leaky gut, autoimmune disease, chronic digestive disorders, heart disease, and weight gain.

In The Plant Paradox, Dr. Gundry outlines the health hazards posed by lectins as well as the ways we can avoid them. The main sources of lectins in the American diet include conventionally-raised dairy products, beans, and other legumes, wheat and grains, and specific vegetables and fruits. The simple (and daunting) fact is, lectins are everywhere.

About the author: Steven R. Gundry

Steven R. Gundry is an American doctor and author. He is a former cardiac surgeon and currently runs his own clinic, investigating the impact of diet on health.

– First Sentence – 

The Plant Paradox - Steven R. Gundry
Reading this book contributed to these challenges: 

A Non-Fiction a Month

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